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CARNABY’S BLACK-COCKATOO

The Perth-Peel subpopulation of the iconic, Endangered Carnaby’s Black-Cockatoo continues to decline; primarily due to ongoing clearing of foraging and roosting habitat on the Swan Coastal Plain to make way for development and expansion across the Perth metropolitan area.

Due to most of their native banksia woodland habitat being cleared, Carnaby's have become increasingly reliant upon pine plantations north of Perth to survive.

 
 

the problem

Despite the known importance of the pine plantations as a critical food source, pine trees have been harvested—without replacement— since 2004. Harvesting these pines without planting additional trees for feeding and roosting has clear consequences for this Endangered species.

In fact, data collected from BirdLife Australia’s annual Great Cocky Count shows that since 2010, the Perth-Peel Carnaby’s Black-Cockatoo population has more than halved. This decline has tracked closely against a dwindling food source.

BirdLife Australia has repeatedly submitted requests for the Western Australian Government to refer the removal of this critical food source to the Federal Department of Environment for assessment of the impact it is having on Carnaby’s. We have also called on both the State and Federal Ministers to stop any further harvesting of pine plantations in the short term, until an alternative food source is available.

So far, the Government of Western Australia has failed to refer this action to the Commonwealth for assessment. And in the meantime, pine clearing continues, with the plantations earmarked to be completely gone by 2020. This will likely lead to the extinction of the Perth-Peel Carnaby's population within our lifetime.

This situation is pushing Perth’s Carnaby’s closer towards extinction as our nature laws continue to fail to protect the birds, plants and animals that need them most.

the solution

New national environmental laws would see environmental assessments undertaken by the National Environmental Protection Authority, removing the potential for governments to act as the key decision maker on projects where they have a vested or political conflict of interest.

Our proposed new nature laws would also give the community greater access to the data being used in assessment processes, removing the need for individuals and groups to use Freedom of Information laws to gain access to key facts and challenge poor decision making.

 
 
 
 

Photos:
Carnaby's Black-Cockatoos by Georgina Steytler

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